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#WDR2018

  1. Standards and working conditions 17 April 2018

    Education International assesses World Bank's Development Report on education

    Just ahead of the World Bank Spring Meetings, Education International is launching a publication that brings together multiple voices from around the world to provide a Reality Check on the World Bank’s 2018 World Development Report on education.

    Education International assesses World Bank's Development Report on education
  2. Achieving Sustainable Development Goal 4 10 April 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #22: “Learning Matters and the World Development Report 2018”, by Keith Lewin

    Keith Lewin

    “Learning to Realise Education’s Promise” is the first time the World Bank has devoted an entire 240 page World Development Report (WDR) to education and learning. It is surprising that it has taken so long given that the main purpose of the Bank is to finance development, and low income...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #22: “Learning Matters and the World Development Report 2018”, by Keith Lewin
  3. Leading the profession 3 April 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #21: "The educational “anti-policy” financed by the World Bank in El Salvador", by Israel Montano

    Israel Montano Osorio

    The recommendations of the World Development Report (WDR) 2018 show that the World Bank has not learned from its mistakes and continues to offer poor advice regarding education policies. In El Salvador, as in other countries, rather than forming part of the solution, the World Bank is in many ways...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #21: "The educational “anti-policy” financed by the World Bank in El Salvador", by Israel Montano
  4. Future of work in education 27 March 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #20: Half-Hearted Commitment to Teacher Learning, by Mark Ginsburg

    Mark Ginsburg

    I recently completed work on a moderated discussion (Ginsburg et al., 2018) for the Comparative Education Review (CER) focused on the World Development Report 2018: Learning to Realize Education’s Promise (WDR) (Filmer et al., 2018). In the moderated discussion I muted my voice in order to facilitate a conversation among...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #20: Half-Hearted Commitment to Teacher Learning, by Mark Ginsburg
  5. Achieving Sustainable Development Goal 4 20 March 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #19: Early Childhood in the WDR 2018: Acknowledged, but Still Rooted in Western-Centric and Economically-Focused Thinking by Helge Wasmuth and Elena Nitecki

    Elena Nitecki, Helge Wasmuth

    The World Development Report (WDR) recognizes the importance of the formative years, which is a positive step toward addressing many problems facing children and families. It was refreshing to read that issues like poverty, malnutrition, pre- and post-natal care, and parent education (pp. 9, 21, 112) are acknowledged as powerful...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #19: Early Childhood in the WDR 2018: Acknowledged, but Still Rooted in Western-Centric and Economically-Focused Thinking by Helge Wasmuth and Elena Nitecki
  6. Leading the profession 13 March 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #18: “Behind the Scores; Myths on Korean education” by Hyunsu Hwang

    Hyunsu Hwang

    The “Forward” of the 2018 World Development Report (WDR) by the World Bank Group’s president, Jim Yong Kim, shocked me. It starts: “Education and learning raise aspirations, set values, and ultimately enrich lives. The country where I was born, the Republic of Korea, is a good example of how education...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #18: “Behind the Scores; Myths on Korean education” by Hyunsu Hwang
  7. Leading the profession 6 March 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #17: The World Bank’s Reports and its Practices – Organised Hypocrisy? By Salim Vally

    Salim Vally

    This blog argues that the inconsistencies of the World Bank seen as instances of ‘organised hypocrisy’ and ‘duplicity’ are not new nor are they limited to the area of education. On the heels of the WDR, another significant World Bank report, The Changing Wealth of Nations 2018: Building a Sustainable...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #17: The World Bank’s Reports and its Practices – Organised Hypocrisy? By Salim Vally
  8. Fighting the commercialisation of education 27 February 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #16: Early Childhood Education, Poverty and Privatization: Why is ECE so important and underfunded in World Bank policy? By Carol Anne Spreen

    Carol Anne Spreen

    Learning does not begin when a child enters school. It is widely known that from birth to age five the brain develops more rapidly than at any other stage of life, and it is also most sensitive to influences from the external environment (such as cognitive stimulation, language development, care,...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #16: Early Childhood Education, Poverty and Privatization: Why is ECE so important and underfunded in World Bank policy? By Carol Anne Spreen
  9. Leading the profession 20 February 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #15: Technical and vocational education and training – realising the potential to transform the lives of millions, by Pat Forward

    Pat Forward

    The most striking features of the World Development Report 2018’s chapter on technical and vocational training (TVET) are that it is a superficial examination of the role and impact of TVET around the world, and that it persists in perpetuating a very narrow framing of the role that the sector...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #15: Technical and vocational education and training – realising the potential to transform the lives of millions, by Pat Forward
  10. Leading the profession 13 February 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #14: Where is the World in the WDR 2018? An Appeal to Rename it the ‘American Development Report’ by Jeremy Rappleye & Hikaru Komatsu

    Jeremy Rappleye, Hikaru Komatsu

    The 2018 World Development Report “Learning to Realize Education’s Promise” provides deep insights into the worldview of the World Bank, the world’s most powerful development institution. Instead of critically questioning the Bank’s explicit claims – as most of the blogs thus far have done – it is also worth pausing...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #14: Where is the World in the WDR 2018? An Appeal to Rename it the ‘American Development Report’ by Jeremy Rappleye & Hikaru Komatsu
  11. Union renewal and development 6 February 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #13: “It’s not a learning crisis, it’s an international development crisis! A decolonial critique” by Iveta Silova

    Iveta Silova

    The 2018 World Development Report (WDR) “Learning to Realize Education’s Promise” has been widely praised for placing education at the forefront of the international development agenda. But while signaling a global commitment to increasing education access and quality in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the 2018 WDR...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #13: “It’s not a learning crisis, it’s an international development crisis! A decolonial critique” by Iveta Silova
  12. Leading the profession 30 January 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #12:The World Bank and the chalkface: a teacher’s perspective by Jelmer Evers

    Jelmer Evers

    My colleagues in my school probably know the World Bank quite superficially, at least if they teach economics history, geography or social sciences. For the rest of them I would say there is name recognition, but not much more than that. However, they would recognize its policy, the tone and...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #12:The World Bank and the chalkface: a teacher’s perspective by Jelmer Evers
  13. Leading the profession 23 January 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #11: School-Based Management: Questions and Concerns by D. Brent Edwards Jr.

    D. Brent Edwards Jr.

    One of the primary avenues highlighted for educational improvement in the World Bank’s World Development Report (WDR) 2018 is school-based management (SBM). This is not surprising, as SBM has been one of the World Bank’s preferred education governance reforms since the 1990s. Indeed, as Dean Nielsen, former Senior Evaluation Officer...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #11: School-Based Management: Questions and Concerns by D. Brent Edwards Jr.
  14. Equity and inclusion 19 January 2018

    Education financing crisis sorely missed in World Bank’s Report

    Education International has made the voice of the world’s educators heard loud and clear at the Belgian launch of the World Bank’s World Development Report.

    Education financing crisis sorely missed in World Bank’s Report
  15. Achieving Sustainable Development Goal 4 16 January 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #10: “We Need More than Just Better Teachers?” by Pasi Sahlberg

    Pasi Sahlberg

    The World Development report 2018 (WDR2018) is right about the global learning crisis: many children not in school, educational inequity, and low quality of learning outcomes. But it often misses the point when trying to use available evidence to realize education’s promise. The problem is that there are so many...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #10: “We Need More than Just Better Teachers?” by Pasi Sahlberg
  16. Achieving Sustainable Development Goal 4 9 January 2018

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #9: A Critical Analysis of the World Bank’s World Development Report on Education by Steven J. Klees

    Steve Klees

    The annual World Development Report (WDR) is the World Bank’s flagship publication. The 2018 report is entitled Learning to Realize Education’s Promise. In the 40 year history of the WDR, this is the first time its focus has been on education. Many commentators have welcomed this as needed in this...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #9: A Critical Analysis of the World Bank’s World Development Report on Education by Steven J. Klees
  17. Leading the profession 19 December 2017

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #8: "Unions do contribute to quality education. An example from the Gambia", by Marie Antoinette Corr

    Marie Antoinette Corr

    The World Development Report 2018 recognises, although briefly, that poor working conditions for teachers can undermine learning (p.138). It argues that the status of the teaching profession has declined over the last few decades, and that as a result, “teachers deserve more from the systems that employ them” (p.138).

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #8: "Unions do contribute to quality education. An example from the Gambia", by Marie Antoinette Corr
  18. Equity and inclusion 12 December 2017

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #7: “The Gender Dimension in the World Bank’s Perception”, by Nelly Stromquist

    Nelly P. Stromquist

    With the production of a World Development Report focused on education, the World Bank makes a decisive claim to its authority in education policy. Given an introductory section acknowledging 119 “researchers and specialists across the world” who provided “feedback and suggestions” for the report (WDR 2018 hereafter), it would seem...

    #WDR2018 Reality Check #7: “The Gender Dimension in the World Bank’s Perception”, by Nelly Stromquist